Tuesday, 28 October 2014

Does wearing makeup make me less of a feminist?


The answer to the question I've used to title this post is both complicated and not - I really don't think wearing make up could ever make you any less of a woman, any less real, any less anything. There is no set criteria for what makes someone a feminist other than wanting equality and harmony between the sexes. The real issue lies in why we would ever have made such a ridiculous claim to begin with. There's been a lot of talk over the last couple of weeks over the relationship between make up and feminism, and while I really don't care to write an evidenced-based essay on which side of the fence I fall, I thought I'd talk a little about what it means to me.

As a twelve year old with a very, very oily T-Zone and a monobrow to rival a werewolves, I found myself purchasing cheap W7 powder and lipgloss from a local market stall. My friends and I would sneak this on during lunch at school. It made us feel a little more comfortable, just a little more grown up.Prior to this I only really had those cheap, sort of pretend make up sets that I would apply strictly at home and pretend to be a Spice Girl or a member of S Club 7. Cool, huh?

During my early teens I got a little wacky with make up thanks to a gothy stage, with white face powder (I know, ridiculous), black and red eyeshadow a la My Chemical Romance and as much chipped black nail varnish as I could get my hands on. I also finally tackled the wolf brows and embarked on a MySpace selfie series to rival all others. I enjoyed using make up more like face paint and yeah I was a tad weird but I feel like that period of self expression is something I needed to go through. It helped me identify with a culture.

I mostly moved on from this once I hit year 11 and Sixth Form, and actually went really minimal for a while in terms of not really bothering with eyes and lips. Even in my first year of uni I didn't go particularly overboard and always stuck to cheap brands like 17 and Rimmel, which a few years ago weren't exactly game changing with their products.

The rest of uni was spent too wrapped up in books to be wholly bothered by make up, but I did develop a signature look involving winged eyeliner that made me feel like I'd at least made half an effort and kept a little of my former edginess.

These days make up is partly about making my skin look its best - the stress of working and moving as well as some baaaaad eating habits have not been kind to me and I have to admit I long for the virtually spot free if slightly shiny skin of my late teens. I do enjoy experimenting with different looks though and have been investing more in quality products but I don't ever take make up too seriously.

I know there are probably are people out there whose relationship with make up is a little unhealthy, but what that has to do with feminism is totally beyond me. Wear make up for you, nobody else. If you do that you really can't go wrong!

How do you feel about your relationship with make up?
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